National Center for Higher Education Management Systems

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51 Measuring-Up on College-Level Learning Ewell, Peter T. - Miller, Margaret A. 2005 FREE Download test Available for download through The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education 2 http://www.highereducation.org/reports/mu_learning/index.shtml NULL
52 General Education and the Assessment Reform Agenda Ewell, Peter T. 2004 $12.00 Calls for accountability in higher education by focusing on abilities, alignment, assessment, and action. Available for purchase from the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). 2 https://secure.aacu.org/source/Orders/index.cfm?section=unknown&task=3&SKU=EWELL&DESCRIPTION=&FindSpec=&CFTOKEN=35896459&continue=1&SEARCH_TYPE= NULL
53 Accreditation and the Provision of Additional Information to the Public About Institutional and Program Performace Ewell, Peter T. 2004 FREE Download Available for download through the Council for Higher Edcuation Accreditation (CHEA) 2 http://www.chea.org/pdf/CHEA_OP_May04.pdf NULL
54 Accountability System for 'Doubling the Numbers' Ewell, Peter T. 2003 $14.95 A Chapter in Double the Numbers: Postsecondary Attainment and Underrepresented Youth Available through the Harvard Education Press 1 http://www.hepg.org/hep/book/44
55 Accreditation and Student Learning Outcomes: A Proposed Point of Departure Ewell, Peter T. 2001 FREE Download Available for download through the Council for Higher Edcuation Accreditation (CHEA) 2 http://www.chea.org/pdf/EwellSLO_Sept2001.pdf NULL
69 Developing and Maintaining the Information Infrastructure for State Level Higher Education Policymaking Jones, Dennis P. - Paulson, Karen 2001 FREE Download Good policymaking requires information that is both accurate and relevant to the decisionmaking process. This is true whether the decisions are to be made at the national, state, or institutional levels. Because higher education is primarily a state-level responsibility, sound higher education policy depends particularly on the availability of information that supports decisionmaking at this level. Poor information at the state level can result in decisions that negatively affect large numbers of students, institutions, and citizens in multiple ways. Relevant information enables substantive discourse, dialogue, and debate about key policy issues in higher education. Prepared with Support from The Ford Foundation 12 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/InformationInfrastructure.pdf NULL
70 Critical Connections: Linking States' Unit Record Systems to Track Student Progress Ewell, Peter T. - Boeke, Marianne 2007 FREE Download Multi-lateral exchanges of data drawn from state-level student unit-record systems (SURs) hold considerable promise for enhancing policymakers' and researchers' understanding of how students flow through the increasingly complex postsecondary educational pipeline. Because most students now attend multiple institutions in order to earn a degree and many cross state lines in doing so, constructing a comprehensive picture of longitudinal enrollment behavior requires drawing data from multiple sources and housing these data in a secure environment capable of supporting sophisticated data analyses. Supported by a grant from the Lumina Foundation for Education, NCHEMS examined the data contents of all extant state-level SURs and, as documented by a report published by Lumina in April of 2003 entitled Following the Mobile Student, determined that they contained the requisite data elements to support such an approach. Available for download from the Lumina Foundation. 12 http://www.luminafoundation.org/publications/Critical_Connections_Web.pdf NULL
71 Some Next Steps for States: A Follow-up to Measuring Up 2000 Jones, Dennis P. - Paulson, Karen 2001 FREE Download In autumn 2000, the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education (the NationalCenter) published Measuring Up 2000, the first state-by-state report card on higher education.Using multiple measures, Measuring Up 2000 graded every state in five performance categoriesrelated to undergraduate higher education preparation, participation, affordability, completion,and benefits. State grades in each of these areas were calculated based on the performance of thebest-performing states. As a result, Measuring Up 2000 provides each state not only with anindication of its performance in five crucial areas of higher education, but also with a benchmark to which it can legitimately aspire; top performance is defined by a state's actual achievement, not by some theoretical target. Several steps are required to bridge the gap between Measuring Up 2000 and informed policymaking between the initial stages of issue identification and subsequent action. Overall, these steps include more robust, in-state diagnosis of the signals, and action to either ameliorate problems or build on successes. 12 http://www.highereducation.org/reports/next_steps/next_steps_jones.pdf NULL
74 Adult Learners in the United States: A National Profile Paulson, Karen - Boeke, Marianne 2006 $10.00 This monograph summarizes published data and research about the characteristics and enrollment patterns of adult learners enrolled for credit in postsecondary institutions in the United States. It is intended as a convenient and concise reference for college and university leaders who currently serve--or plan to serve--adult learners and who seek more information on this student population for themselves, campus colleagues, or external constituents. Available for purchase from the American Council on Education 3 http://store.acenet.edu/showItem.aspx?product=311057&session=54D27E61CDDB478CA34D49346DD80423 NULL
76 Student Learning as Academic Currency Johnstone, Sally M. - Ewell, Peter T. - Paulson, Karen 2001 FREE Download This monograph, fourth in the ACE/EDUCAUSE series Distributed Education: Challenges, Choices, and a New Environment, explores how distributed education challenges the credit hour as the standard measure of student progress. It describes a system based on alternate measurements of student learning that accommodates the asynchronous nature of distributed education. The paper also examines the institutional, state, and federal policy implications of an alternative measurement system. Available from American Council on Education 2 http://www.acenet.edu/bookstore/pdf/distributed-learning/distributed-learning-04.pdf NULL
86 As America Becomes More Diverse: The Impact of State Higher Education Inequality Kelly, Patrick J. 2005 FREE Download In America, values of social justice and equal opportunity should be sufficient reason to drive us toward equality in higher education. But there also are economic reasons to address this issue.This report focuses largely on the latter and clearly exposes our failures and the pressing need to improve.With few exceptions, it is now critical for individuals to attain some level of education beyond high school in order to experience a middle-class lifestyle and for the states in which they live to compete in the global economy. Increased educational attainment results in higher personal income, a better-skilled and more adaptable workforce, fewer demands on social services, higher levels of community involvement, and better decisions regarding healthcare and personal finance (National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, 2004). At a time when higher education is increasingly important, some visible race/ethnic groups are consistently in the have not category of our society. With support from the Lumina Foundation. 13 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/InequalityPaperJan2006.pdf NULL
87 A New Look at the Institutional Component of Higher Education Finance: A Guide for Evaluating Performance Relative to Financial Resources Kelly, Patrick J. - Jones, Dennis P. 2005 FREE Download Although state and local governments are working their way out of fiscal crises precipitated bythe national recession of 2001 and the stock market declines of 2000 through 2002, public higher education remains in steep competition with other public sectors for continued state support. These are not entirely unusual times for public higher education. It has on several occasions throughout history dealt with and recovered from economic downturns that have squeezed many sources of revenue. However, the most recent recovery is accompanied by rising costs in healthcare, corrections, and sustained efforts to maintain support for K-12 education, leaving higher education as the largest discretionary item in many state budgets. Because of these constraints, there is a general feeling among many state policymakers that higher education is not likely to recover its support as quickly as it has in past economic recessions.Revised 2007. With Support from The Pew Charitable Trusts. 4 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/PolicyGuideJan2007.pdf NULL
88 Conceptualizing and Researching the Educational Pipeline Ewell, Peter T. - Jones, Dennis P. - Kelly, Patrick J. 2003 FREE Download While there has been much written about dropout from high school and student retention in college as separate phenomena, little conceptual or empirical work examines how the two fit together. Thinking about this matter is timely for at least two reasons. First, the reform movement in standards-based education for K-12 educationis beginning to foster significant discussions about the transition between high school and college in many states a policy agenda usually termed K-16. Second, state and national leaders also have a renewed interest in enhancing educational attainment, not just from an educational perspective, but as a key social asset.Partly stimulated by such publications as Measuring Up (National Center for Public Policy in Higher Education, 2000, 2002), governors and other policymakers are increasingly viewing high levels of educational capital as key to the economic development of their states and the quality of life of their citizens. 11 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/PipelineArticle.pdf NULL
89 As America Becomes More Diverse: The Impact of State Higher Education Inequality (Presentation) Kelly, Patrick J. 2005 FREE Download PowerPoint Presentation to the NCES/SHEEO Network Conference, April 12, 2005. 13 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/NCES_SHEEO_April_2005.ppt NULL
92 Accountability: The Latest (and Greatest) Challenge for Online Learning? (Presentation) Hardy, Darcy - Chaloux, Bruce - Paulson, Karen - Robinson, Rob 2006 FREE Download Presented at WCET 18th Annual Conference, 2006. 1 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/WCET2006OnlineAccountability.pdf NULL
93 Where's the Data? Conducting a First-Year Data Audit (Presentation) Paulson, Karen 2002 FREE Download PowerPoint presentation for the Policy Center for the First Year of College, Ashville, NC, July 2002. 6 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/2002FirstYearDataAuditPresentation.ppt NULL
97 Making the Grade: How Boards Can Ensure Academic Quality Ewell, Peter T. 2006 $59.00 Making the Grade: How Boards Can Ensure Academic Quality fills a significant void in today's boardroom discussions with its clear, realistic advice and its "perfect pitch" balancing act with respect to board involvement with the heart of the academic enterprise: teaching and learning. Available for purchase from The Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB). 1 http://agb.org/store/making-grade-how-boards-can-ensure-academic-quality NULL
98 State-Level Accountability for Higher Education: On the Edge of a Transformation Ewell, Peter T. - Jones, Dennis P. 2006 $29.00 Chapter in Practitioners on Making Accountability Work for the Public: New Directions for Higher Education, Nancy B. Shulock, Editor.A rash of new publications from nearly every national higher education organization address accountability. The purpose of this volume is to highlight the emerging consensus from this work and show how these ideas are playing out across the country. It is a collection of essays by practitioners, many at the highest levels of U.S. higher education, who have been asked to focus on how accountability systems in their states and at their institutions are being used and for what purposes. As consensus emerges that state-level accountability should be focused on the state's public agenda rather than institutional effectiveness, it becomes important for institutions to align their goals around those at the state level. This volume presents several stories from the state perspective and several from the institutional perspective and includes two chapters that comment on the overall prospects for, and challenges facing, this new paradigm for public accountability in higher education. Available for purchase from Jossey-Bass. 2 http://www.josseybass.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0787994723.html NULL
104 Mounting Pressures Facing the U.S. Workforce and the Increasing Need for Adult Education and Literacy (Presentation) Kelly, Patrick J. 2007 FREE Download Presented at the Education Commission of the States (ECS) Conference, Summer 2007. 13 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/PatrickKellyECSJuly2007.ppt NULL
106 Good Policy, Good Practice. Improving Outcomes and Productivity in Higher Education: A Guide for Policymakers Callan, Patrick M. - Ewell, Peter T. - Finney, Joni E. - Jones, Dennis P. 2007 FREE Download Part I of Good Policy, Good Practice offers examples of strategies, programs,and practices that our research fi nds can raise educational productivity. The examples cited in this report were compiled and organized by the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems and the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. We offer these examples to inform policymakers of promising practices and policy leadership thatsupport improvements. We particularly sought programs and practices that challenged the conventional wisdom that gains in educational productivity or efficiency must necessarily come at the expense of quality or access. The three strategies and the programs described are included because they are designed to enhance higher education opportunity, educational effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness. Part II of Good Policy, Good Practice describes the levers that state policymakers can use, directly and indirectly, to infl uence improvements. It is unlikely that systematic productivity gains of the magnitude needed and that are possible with widespread adoption of the types of strategies identified in Part I can be achieved without deliberately designed andsupportive state policy frameworks. Reorientation of public investment, of statutes and regulations, of accountability measures, and, in some instances, of governance structures may be required to raise productivity. These policy levers are necessarily described in Part II with less specifi city thanthe strategies in Part I. These levers are, we believe, relevant to most states, but implementation strategies depend on state context. Part II emphasizes the necessity of state policy support and, if needed, policy change. Without long-term state policy leadership and commitment, it is unlikely that eventhe most promising programs described in Part I will achieve the scale and sustainability needed for broad impact in both prosperous and lean budgetary times. 12 http://www.highereducation.org/reports/Policy_Practice/GPGP.pdf NULL
108 Indiana's Adult Education and Workforce Skills Performance Report: Preparing Adults for a Brighter Future Kelly, Patrick J. 2008 FREE Download Like most Midwestern states, Indiana's history is rooted in the pre-industrial and industrial economiesin which it competed quite well in the production, transportation, and agricultural industries. It nowstands at a crossroads, where it can embrace its past but must prepare for the challenges ahead. Thenew road to success will rely largely on the creation and retention of knowledge-based jobs and theskilled workers needed to fill them. Even within traditional industries like manufacturing andextraction, low-skilled jobs are moving offshore or being replaced by technology, while the jobsremaining require more education than ever before. A report from the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, Developed by the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, With Support from The Joyce Foundation 13 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/INAdultEdWkfReport2-08.pdf NULL
109 U.S. Accreditation and the Future of Quality Assurance: A Tenth Anniversary Report from the Council for Higher Education Accreditation Ewell, Peter T. 2008 29.95 This book provides a comprehensive review of the current role of accreditation in the United States and considers its future. The principal audiences for which it was prepared are policy leaders at institutions, higher education associations, accrediting organizations and government agencies. All types of accreditation are addressed, including institutional (regional, national faith-related and national career-related) and programmatic. The monograph consists of six chapters:Chapter 1 first sets the stage for discussion by examining the need for the nation's higher education system to significantly improve its performance and the role of accreditation as the principal quality assurance mechanism within this system. The bulk of Chapter 1 presents seven important trends in the environment for higher education that will have major impacts on how accreditation operates.Chapter 2 provides a brief history of accreditation in the United States over four periods for each of the four major types of accrediting organizations regional, national faith-related, national career-related and programmatic.Chapter 3 deals with the relationship between accreditation and the academy by examining the distinctive features that are the hallmarks of higher education in America and accreditation practices that reflect these features.Chapter 4 examines the relationship between accreditation and government.Chapter 5 turns to an assessment of accreditation's strengths and areas of challenge and considers a set of enduring issues that are embedded in accreditation practice.Chapter 6, the final chapter, attempts to block out issues for the future of accreditation in seven areas: governance, substance, learning outcomes, differentiation, consistency, transparency and globalization.Accreditation is a uniquely American approach to quality assurance in higher education that has, up to now, stood the test of time. It is hoped that this publication will help stimulate and inform discussions about its future and help the enterprise improve.Single copy (non-CHEA member) $29.94Single copy (CHEA member) $24.95Two or more copies $24.95Council for Higher Education AccreditationOne Dupont Circle NW, Suite 510Washington, DC 20036-1135Telephone: 202-955-6126http://www.chea.org/store 1 http://www.chea.org/pdf/Ewell_Ad_2012.pdf NULL
110 Beyond Social Justice: The Threat of Inequality to Workforce Development in the Western United States Kelly, Patrick J. 2008 FREE Download For many years, the most fervent arguments for racial/ethnic equality have been crafted on ethical grounds it is just the right thing to do. But increasingly our ability to reduce the racial/ethnic gaps between Whitenon-Hispanics and minorities does not just serve the interests of social justice; it is also crucial to economicwell-being in the West. The following questions are addressed in this the report: *What are the current education gaps between minorities and White non-Hispanics? *How well do we prepare certain minorities for high-skill, high-wage jobs? *What is their status in the workforce as a result? *Has their status in the workforce improved for recent generations? *What would be the impact if we improved our ability to educate these disadvantaged populations? 13 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/beyondSocialJustice.pdf NULL
112 Shaping State Policy to Encourage Stewardship of Place Jones, Dennis P. 2005 FREE Download State governments and those elected to lead them have the core obligation to create conditions within which the citizens of their state can have economic security and a good quality of life where they can be safe, healthy, and provided with cultural and recreational venues in which they can enjoy their leisure time. This is a daunting task. Needs are many and resources are limited, even in the best of times. If these lofty goals are to be achieved, the states' policy leaders must take full advantage of all the assets and tools at their disposal. 12 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/ShapingStatePolicy.pdf NULL
113 Stepping Forward as Stewards of Place: A Guide for Leading Public Engagement Jones, Dennis P. 2002 FREE Download A strategic, ground level guide for presidentsand chancellors and other campusleaders that offers a working definition ofpublic engagement, provides exemplars ofcampus-wide commitment to engagementinitiatives, and proposes concrete actionsfor institutions, public policymakers, andthe association to promote an even fullercommitment to the concept of engagement.While the guide represents theculmination of the task force's work, it isonly the beginning of a broader effort byAASCU to parse and enrich the languageof public engagement, particularly as itrelates to the work of presidents andchancellors.How do presidents and chancellors walkthe walk as well as talk the talk inleading engaged institutions? American Association of State Colleges and Universities 7 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/stewardsofplace_02.pdf NULL
114 Recommended Policies and Practices for Advancing Indiana's System of Adult Education and Workforce Training Kelly, Patrick J. 2009 FREE Download A policy framework and any set of recommended actions must be built on a foundation ofagreed-upon criteria. Based on involvement in Indiana the development of the performancereport, discussions with the Joyce Foundation working teams, and interviews with stakeholders NCHEMS recommends that the following principles guide the agenda to improve Indiana'ssystem of adult education and workforce training: Be systemic incorporating the work of all providers, including education and trainingproviders, workforce development, and economic development. Recognize that these are long-term problems that require long-term solutions andpersistent and vigilant long-term leadership. Be applied without massive reorganization working largely within the currentgovernance structure. Focus largely on non-traditional aged adults (25 and older) and high school dropouts Focus as much as possible on competencies rather than seat-time outcomes ratherthan activities. Develop and maintain the capacity to fund priorities recognizing that (at least in theshort-term) there is likely to be very few new state funds available. Be based on incentives and the allocation of rewards rather than command andcontrol . Be affordable for both students and the state. 13 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/NCHEMSIndianaChamberRecommendationsDecember10.pdf NULL
115 Postsecondary Education Spending Priorities for the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Policy Advisory to State Fiscal Policymakers Callan, Patrick M. - Jones, Dennis P. - Wellman, Jane 2009 FREE Download The Funding Crisis in Higher Education: The collision between constrained public funding and the need to increase postsecondary access and degree attainment is by now well documented. The problem stems from structural pressure on state budgets, growing dependency on tuition revenues that harm access and opportunity, and institutional cost structures that require unsustainable funding increases. The postsecondary funding gap has been growing in most states for some time, and is reaching crisis proportions with the economic collapse of 2008-2009. The economic crisis will push higher education in understandable but predictable directions tuition increases, cutbacks in enrollments, and rollbacks in programs designed to reduce attainment gaps and increase degree production. While states and institutions are facing difficult times, this crisis cannot be construed as a reason to abridge historic commitments to affordability, access, and investment in instructional improvements needed to meet future needs for educational attainment. 12 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/ARRAStatementFebruary2009.pdf NULL
118 Colleges and Universities and Their Stewardship of Place: A Guide for Developing Performance Measures for the Equity of Access and Student Success Kelly, Patrick J. - Ewell, Peter T. 2009 FREE Download As postsecondary education becomes a necessity for nearly all U.S. residents to compete forliving-wage jobs, the ability of colleges and universities to work collectively to expand accessand the opportunity to succeed is vital to our economic well-being. With the exception of arelatively small set of institutions, institutional contributions to this national imperativehinges on the degree to which they act locally . Based on extensive research conducted in avariety of states, the vast majority of postsecondary institutions (two- and four-year) drawtheir undergraduates from geographic areas that fit within a relatively small radius around theinstitution. Despite this reality, many four-year institutions are reluctant to embrace theregional service concept for fear that their reputations and desires to become more selectivemight be threatened. The aspiration to become the best at serving their regions is rare, butsorely needed across the U.S. This is especially true in regions that are becoming morediverse with growing racial/ethnic populations that are underserved. NCHEMS has worked with the National Association of Systems Heads (NASH) withsupport from the Lumina Foundation for Education to develop (1) empirically-basedaccess regions for postsecondary institutions based on student enrollment patterns and (2)access, transition, and completion measures to gauge how well institutions serve theirregions with respect to racial/ethnic equity. This work was conducted to provide additionalinformation to the existing comparative college graduation rates by institution andrace/ethnicity presented on the website www.collegeresults.org developed by theEducation Trust. 11 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/GuideforAnalyzingServiceRegions060509.pdf NULL
120 The Dreaded "P" Word: An Examination of Productivity in Public Postsecondary Education Kelly, Patrick J. 2009 FREE Download As state legislatures convened again this spring, many public postsecondary education leaders were busy trying to prepare more compelling versions of the same old story: We need more state support or at least an inflationary adjustment or we must raise tuition and fees. It is an argument that couples a plea with an ultimatum, and contains the underlying assumption that resources are directly associated with performance. Often absent from this assertion is any information about current levels of funding compared to similar institutionsacross the United States and, more importantly, how well their institutions are performingwith the resources they already have. Some make a legitimate case, but far more give ultimatums. The topic of performance relative to funding (i.e. productivity) is one of the most strained conversationsin postsecondary education. Those called on to support the enterprise policymakersand business leaders routinely ask productivity-related questions, just as they do of any other public entity that seeks their support. In return, postsecondary education leaders provide well-crafted but often unrelated responses. Understandably, they are trying to avoid the difficult question: Are we productive relative to what? 12 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/P_Word_Kelly.pdf NULL
123 Rethinking Conventional Wisdom about Higher Ed Finance Jones, Dennis P. - Wellman, Jane 2009 FREE Download America faces a growing crisis in public postsecondary education, as an unprecedented fiscal meltdown plays out at a time of growing consensus about the urgent need to nearly double levels of degree attainment. Instead of taking steps to develop an investment strategy to reduce access and achievement gaps, we are moving in the opposite direction: reductions in state finances, increases in tuition, cutbacks in enrollments, and reductions in courses and programs students need to succeed. In an effort to advance the conversation about improving performance in higher education, we've identified our 'top ten' list of conventional wisdoms about higher education finance. 4 http://www.deltacostproject.org/resources/pdf/advisory_10_Myths.pdf NULL
124 State-Level Completion and Transfer Rates: Harnessing a New National Resource Ewell, Peter T. - Kelly, Patrick J. 2009 FREE Download For a long time, the nation did not possess the ability to effectively monitor and report onone of the most important aspects of higher education: student progress and success incompleting educational credentials. The standard method for examining student successwith respect to degree completion is the Graduation Rate Survey (GRS) established bythe National Center for Education Statistics, which requires four-year institutions toreport six-year graduation rates and two-year institutions to report three-year graduationrates. But these calculations are limited to students who enroll on a full-time basis duringtheir first term. While colleges and universities can potentially track the progress and success of theirown students regardless of their credit load as long as they are enrolled, little informationis available about the progress of those who change institutions or stop out several timesin the course of earning a degree. For the forty-two states that maintain state-levelStudent Unit Record (SUR) databases, it is possible to track students from institution toinstitution within the boundaries of the state (Ewell and Boeke 2007). But the ability tolink state SUR databases together to examine student mobility is limited and awkward.Furthermore, efforts to remedy this condition by creating a national student unit recordsystem under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Education have been stalled formore than three years. To explore an alternative, the Lumina Foundation for Educationsupported the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS)and the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education (NCPPHE) to work withthe National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) in utilizing NSC's extensive student dataholdings to create state-level degree completion rates on a national basis. 11 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/NCHEMSNSCDraftReportSeptember2009.pdf NULL
125 Assessment, Accountability, and Improvement: Revisiting the Tension Ewell, Peter T. 2009 FREE Download Many of the same tensions that characterized the accountability and improvement purposes of student learning outcomes assessment when the assessment movement began in the mid-1980s still exist today. In this paper I examine these tensions and how they can be managed, if not completely resolved. First, I outline the major relevant changes affecting the assessment movement that have occurred in higher education over the past two decades. These include the perceived legitimacy of assessment today, the demand by policymakers for better and more transparent information about student and institutional performance, the press by accreditors on institutions to collect and use student learning outcomes data, and the availability of more and better assessment instruments and approaches. Available for free from the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA). 2 http://www.learningoutcomesassessment.org/documents/PeterEwell_006.pdf NULL
126 Following the Mobile Student: Can We Develop the Capacity for a Comprehensive Database to Assess Student Progression? Ewell, Peter T. - Schild, Paula R. - Paulson, Karen 2003 FREE Download The need for complete measurements ofstudent success in the nation's collegesand universities is critical today. Tothrive as a nation, we must ensure thatmore students reach their educational goals.Unfortunately, current enrollment statistics andgraduation rates don't tell us enough about thedetails of student achievement to allow us todevelop effective policies for student success. A major problem in measuring student successin postsecondary education is the difficulty intracking students' progress as they transfer fromone institution to another. Data on these studentsare collected, of course, but such student-leveldata, often termed unit-record (UR) data,generally are specific to each institution. Thatmakes it difficult to determine whether a dropout at one school goes on to complete a degree atanother. In short, we know that hundreds ofthousands of students transfer each year, and weknow that current data on student retentionreported at the institutional level are incompleteand probably inaccurate, but we have no way ofknowing the extent of those inaccuracies. Funded by the Lumina Foundation for Education. 11 http://www.luminafoundation.org/publications/researchreports/NCHEMS.pdf NULL
128 Emerging Policy Triangle: Economic Development, Workforce Development and Education Jones, Dennis P. - Kelly, Patrick J. 2007 FREE Download Updated Profiles for All 50 States and Including International Comparative Data. Few issues unite policymakers in quite the same way as that of economic development. Whether their responsibilities are national, state, regional, or local in nature, individuals whose job it is to make and implement public policy find common ground in their interests in ensuring economic growth and prosperity. All understand that the American way of life is fundamentally dependent on economic competitiveness. They also understand the rest of the equation strong economies are characterized by an abundance of well-paying jobs and, overwhelmingly, well-paying jobs are held by individuals who have knowledge and skills obtained through education beyond high school. Where physical capital drives industrial economies, human capital drives economies in the information age. In November 2004 WICHE published the originalversion of The Emerging Policy Triangle: EconomicDevelopment, Workforce Development, and Education.This report was funded through a grant from theFord Foundation entitled Expanding Engagement:Public Policy to Meet State and Regional Needs whichsought to better inform legislators and other keypolicymakers about a confluence of forces bearingdown on higher education and the resultingimpacts to state goals and priorities. The analysis,prepared by Dennis Jones and Patrick Kelly of theNational Center for Higher Education ManagementSystems argued that state policymakers neededto pay greater attention to the role of education especially postsecondary education in meetingstate workforce and economic development goals.Using an array of data, the report highlighted theways in which a state's stock of human capitalis depleted and replenished through education,migration, and the aging of the workforce (i.e.,retirements). In its appendix, the report providedprofiles containing key related indicators for the 15member states of WICHE. 13 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/EmergingPolicyTriangle.pdf NULL
129 Closing the College Attainment Gap between the U.S. and Most Educated Countries, and the Contributions to be made by the States Kelly, Patrick J. 2010 FREE Download In February 2009, President Barack Obama told a joint session of Congress: By 2020, America will once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world . Higher education policymakers across the country were immediately encouraged by this statement, and a variety of policy organizations quickly set out to calculate the number of degrees needed for the U.S. to meet this ambitious goal. A variety of analyses ensued; each applying different combinations of educational attainment targets, age‐groups, and assumptions. But the use of different assumptions and methodologies is resulting in degree production models that run the risk of confusing, rather than clarifying, this important issue. This has prompted efforts to agree upon a common methodology, and to involve key organizations and stakeholders in the process. The following brief contains the methodology and calculations proposed by NCHEMS, with input from staffs of the U.S. Department of Education and the White House's Council of Economic Advisers, the National Center for Education Statistics, and the Delta Project on Postsecondary Costs, Productivity, and Accountability. It briefly describes: (1) the rationale for determining the college attainment goal for the U.S., (2) the calculations used to derive the number of additional college degrees the U.S. needs by 2020, (3) an estimate of the additional degrees each state should produce in order to contribute to the nation's goal, and (4) several assumptions and limitations associated with the approach. 12 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/ClosingtheUSDegreeGapNCHEMSFinal.pdf NULL
132 State Policies on the Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes: Results of a Fifty-State Inventory Zis, Stacey - Boeke, Marianne - Ewell, Peter T. 2010 FREE Download As part of the Center for State Policy on Student Progression (C2SP)this report examines the frequency and characteristics of state policies with respect to the assessment of student learning by examining a) state use of cognitive testing to examine undergraduate learning, b) state use of standardized testing for developmental placement, c) state use of surveys, and d) state requirements for public institutions to engage in assessment. 2 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/C2SPStateAssessment_Final_6_21_2010.pdf NULL
133 State Policies on Student Transitions: Results of a Fifty-State Inventory Ewell, Peter T. - Boeke, Marianne - Zis, Stacey 2008 FREE Download As part of the Center for State Policy on Student Progression (C2SP), this study concentrates on four key transitions that directly affect the number of college graduates that a state can generate.1 The first is the transition from high school to college. This transition is influenced by policies that establish high school exit standards, put college-preparatory high school curricula in place, establish explicit competency or skill levels that define college readiness, or create dual enrollment programs through which high school students can earn college credit. The second transition is from pre-college to college-level work. This is affected by policies governing basic skills testing and placement. The third transition is from two-year to four-year institutions of higher education. This is affected by state policies about transfer of credits and degrees. The fourth and final transition is from the status of being enrolled in a postsecondary institution to having graduated from one. This is affected by policies on acceleration or the availability of alternative ways for students to make progress, and the provision of incentives to institutions to increase graduation rates or incentives to students to graduate on time. Sections of the report on each of these topics describe the approaches taken by the fifty states. Individual summaries of each state's response can be found on the NCHEMS C2SP web page at www.nchems.org/c2sp. Most of these state entries contain multiple links to state web pages describing policies in detail. Please visit http://nchems.org/c2sp/transitions.php for a summary report and each individual state reports. 11 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/TransitionsSurveyReport_April2009.pdf NULL
134 Tracking Student Progression: The State of the States Ewell, Peter T. - Boeke, Marianne 2006 FREE Download In April 2003, the Lumina Foundation published a comprehensive inventory of state-levelStudent Unit Record (SUR) capacity prepared by the National Center for Higher EducationManagement Systems (Ewell, Schild and Paulson 2003). The primary intent of this effort was toexamine the feasibility of linking student data drawn from multiple states to track students on anational basis. Since that time, interest in SUR databases has evolved considerably. On the onehand, the need for states to develop capable K-12 databases to meet the reporting requirements ofNo Child Left Behind (NCLB) has stimulated vigorous efforts to design and implement newsystems, as well as a national Data Quality Campaign (DQC) to promote best practice in thisarena. This report presents the results of a new fifty-state inventory of state SURcapacity undertaken by NCHEMS with further Lumina support. In addition to the topics of dataelement coverage and analytical capability addressed by the 2002 survey, the current inventoryexamines more closely how states are linking SUR data with other data sources and how they are using the resulting information. It also examines some of the cross-cutting issues that states arefacing in this arena and how they are addressing them. Results are presented in six sections. Thefirst section describes the methodology used by NCHEMS to conduct the 50-state survey andanalyze its results. The second presents results on the overall status of state and system-levelSURs on a number of dimensions, including the proportion of states that have such databases andtheir overall capabilities. The third takes these findings to a finer level of detail by examiningthe specific data elements contained in these systems and the extent of definitional commonalityacross systems. It also examines the capacity of states to generate a common core of dataelements suitable for consistent tracking. The fourth section examines the most commonapplications of state SUR data through regular reporting. The fifth section presents cross-cuttingchallenges and issues, while the report's final section provides some recommendations formoving forward. Additional information including SUR Report Tables and individual state reports can be found at http://www.nchems.org/c2sp/sur/ 12 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/SURSurveyReport.pdf NULL
135 Good Policy, Good Practice II: Improving Outcomes and Productivity in Higher Education - A Guide for Policymakers Brenneman, Meghan Wilson - Callan, Patrick M. - Ewell, Peter T. - Finney, Joni E. - Jones, Dennis P. - Zis, Stacey 2010 FREE Download This new edition of Good Policy, Good Practice II revises and updates our 2007 publication.Like the earlier edition, it responds to one of the questions that is raised most frequently inour work with public policy and education leaders as they begin to address the national andstate imperatives to increase the proportion of Americans who enroll in college programs andcomplete degrees and certificates, and to improve the cost effectiveness and affordability ofhigher education. Their question is: Are there proven policies, programs, and practices that wecan learn from? The answer is clearly yes. Good Policy, Good Practice II describes some of the programsand practices that hold the most promise for raising educational productivity. This secondedition attempts to rectify a shortcoming of the initial report the need to be explicit about therequirement for convergence of policy and practice. The lack of connection between institutionalattempts to improve practice and public policy that supports these innovations explains, inno small part, the limited implementations of many of the innovative educational practicesproven to be most effective. We call attention to the need for policy change if current andfuture innovations are to be systematically developed, supported, replicated, implemented ona large scale, and sustained. Significant progress in the absence of both institutional and policyleadership working in tandem is unlikely.Good Policy, Good Practice II was supported by a grant from Lumina Foundation forEducation. 12 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/GoodPolicy_GoodPractice_II_2010.pdf NULL
136 State Uses of Accreditation: Results of a Fifty-State Inventory Ewell, Peter T. - Boeke, Marianne - Zis, Stacey 2010 FREE Download How states authorize postsecondary institutions to operate within their boundaries is oneof the least well documented topics in higher education today.1 No two states do this thesame way and jurisdictional boundaries among the state agencies that perform thesefunctions are sometimes uncertain (Goldstein, Lacey, and Janiga 2006). The role ofinstitutional accreditation in helping to ground these decisions is equally murky. Isaccreditation required to apply for authorization to operate? If so, is there a definedwindow of time in which an institution must obtain accreditation? Or is there norelationship with accreditation whatsoever? Similarly, for programmatic or specializedaccreditation in licensed occupations such as education or the health professions, is thecompletion of an accredited course of study required for an individual to obtain a licenseto practice or to sit for a licensing examination? And is appropriate programmatic orspecialized accreditation required for institutions that only teach these fields to beauthorized to operate within the state? The Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) wanted to shed more light onthese matters on a state-by-state basis. In particular, it sought information on how statesuse accredited status in the decision to authorize postsecondary institutions both newlycreated and existing out-of-state to offer instruction and grant degrees in the state. Atthe same time, it wished to determine the various roles that state agencies play that looklike accreditation for example periodic quality monitoring or review through site visitsor desk reviews how these activities are described, and how they are related toinstitutional accreditation. Finally, CHEA wanted to determine the role that accreditedstatus plays in state decisions about which institutions can receive state funds and how itaffects an institution's ability to have its transfer credits accepted as part of any statewidetransfer or articulation policy.To gather information around these questions, CHEA contracted the National Center forHigher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) to conduct a fifty-state inventory ofhow states use accreditation. This report presents the results of this study in three mainsections. The first section describes the broad picture of agency regulation by notingwhich state agencies are responsible for what. The second section looks specifically atthe role of institutional accreditation in governing decisions about authorization tooperate. The third section explores state connections with professional or specialized accreditation in connection with individual licenses to practice.2 A brief concludingsection summarizes the major implications for policy. 12 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/CHEAStateStudy_2010_11_30_10.pdf NULL
137 Strengthening College Opportunity and Performance: Federal State and Institutional Leadership Callan, Patrick M. - Jones, Dennis P. - Wellman, Jane 2010 FREE Download A policy report from The Delta Project on Postsecondary Education Costs, Productivity, and Accountability,The National Center for Higher Education Management Systems, and The National Center for Public Policyand Higher Education 12 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/CrossTalk1110InsertFINALproof.pdf NULL
138 Defining Attainment & Policy Responses to Improve Performance Jones, Dennis P. 2010 FREE Download Paper presented by Dennis Jones at "Raising the Bar for Higher Education in a Time of Fiscal Constraints" in Charlottesville, VA, December 5-6, 2010. This was a joint meeting of the Miller Center of Public Affairs, Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, National Conference of State Legislatures, and National Governors Association. The paper was produced with support from the Lumina Foundation. 12 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/DefiningAttainmentandPolicyResponses.pdf NULL
139 Board Budget Decisions: Protecting and Building Your Institution's Assets Jones, Dennis P. 2011 FREE Download If there ever was a time for college and university leaders to think creatively about allocating their resources, it is now. The pressure to enroll and graduate more students is relentless. Faced with limited employment prospects, and understanding that a decent job requires skill levels beyond those learned in high school, more and more students are knocking at the college door. Published in AGB Trusteeship, January/February 2011 issue 7 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/AGBTrusteeshipJanFeb2011.pdf NULL
140 Breaking Bad Habits: Navigating the Financial Crisis Jones, Dennis P. - Wellman, Jane 2010 FREE Download The Great Recession of 2009 has brought an unprecedented level of financial chaos to public higher education in America. Programs are being reduced, furloughs and layoffs are widespread, class sizes are increasing, sections are being cut, and students can't get into classes needed for graduation. Enrollment losses upwards of several hundred thousand are being reported and only time will tell whether the situation is even worse. Reports of budget cuts in public institutions in the neighborhood of 15 to 20 percent (Pennsylvania, Virginia, New York, Florida, and California) are becoming common. Halfway through the 2009 2010 fiscal year, 48 states were projecting deficits for 2011 and 2012 (NASBO, 2009). From Change Magazine, May/June 2010 12 http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20Issues/May-June%202010/breaking-bad-full.html NULL
141 State Policies Affecting the "Adult Re-Entry Pipeline" in Postsecondary Education: Results of a Fifty-State Inventory Boeke, Marianne - Zis, Stacey - Ewell, Peter T. 2011 FREE Download With support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) is engaged in a two year project centered on state policies that foster student progression and success in the adult re-entry pipeline. The adult re-entry pipeline consists of the many alternative pathways to obtain a postsecondary credential for individuals who did not complete high school and immediately go on to successful college-level study. Prominent components of this population include those young adults (aged 25-34) who never finished high school, those who began postsecondary study but for various reasons did not finish, and those who never enrolled in postsecondary study. Established state policies targeted at access and success are centered largely on the traditional path to college. This path focuses on 18-year-old high school graduates who enter postsecondary study within eight or nine months after earning a high school diploma. Prominent among these policies are college awareness and access programs, targeted financial aid, bridge programs such as early college high schools, and college-skills development programs. In a growing number of states, such policies are aligned and coordinated in the context of an intentional P-16 strategy for improving student success. In contrast, state policies aimed at promoting student success in the adult re-entry pipeline tend to be fragmentary and not systematically aligned. Probably more important from a national perspective, they are not well documented or are unknown altogether.The purpose of this report is to attempt to fill this void by presenting results of a fifty-state inventory of state policies and practices designed to foster greater entry into and flow through the state re-entry pipeline. After a brief discussion of how the survey was conducted, major sections of the report examine the scope and definition of responsibility for this function, fiscal and financial policies and practices, programmatic policies and practices, and policies and practices related to information dissemination and access. 11 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/GatesAdultPolicyInventory_Final.pdf NULL
142 Not Just Kid Stuff Anymore: The Economic Imperative for More Adults to Complete College Kelly, Patrick J. - Strawn, Julie 2011 FREE Download Prepared by the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) and the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) 13 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/NotKidStuffAnymoreAdultStudentProfile-1.pdf NULL
144 Realizing Kentucky's Educational Attainment Goal: A Look in the Rear View Mirror and Down the Road Ahead Kelly, Patrick J. 2011 FREE Download In 1997, policymakers in Kentucky enacted perhaps the most sweeping higher education reform legislation of any state in the past two decades. Kentucky's Postsecondary Education Improvement Act (House Bill 1) has been heralded by many higher education leaders across the U.S. as one of the great success stories a rare instance when a state's governor, legislators, higher education leaders, college and university presidents, and business leaders collectively aligned to implement policies that better serve the residents of the state. The legislation immediately kicked off an agenda for Kentucky's higher education enterprise that is built on the public good rather than the individual needs of colleges and universities. Now more than halfway to the year 2020, it is important to pause and gauge the progress that Kentucky has made during the past decade, and the gains that need to be made between now and 2020 for Kentucky to realize its college attainment and degree production goals. This brief documents Kentucky's movement on a number of key indicators since 2000 and identifies the additional number of college degree-holders needed between now and 2020. While issues of college preparation, developmental education, retention of college students, and student learning (for example) are critical for Kentucky to reach its overall goals, this report focuses largely on measures directly associated with college completion, the educational attainment of the population, and the impact on the state's economy. 12 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/NCHEMSRealizingKentuckysCollegeAttainmentGoal.pdf NULL
145 Adult Learning in Focus: National and State-by-State Data Ewell, Peter T. - Kelly, Patrick J. - Klein-Collins, Rebecca 2008 FREE Download There is a strong and growing argument for higher educational attainment in the United States. The jobs that are expected to support our economy in the coming years will depend on a skilled workforce that is able to learn and adapt quickly to new challenges. However, demographic patterns demonstrate that relying on the traditional K 16 pipeline to meet the educational and workforce needs of our states and the nation will not be enough. In addition, the economic and personal benefits that individuals gain from education also argue for greater focus and emphasis on adult learning. This report was produced by the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL), with funding from Lumina Foundation for Education and in partnership with the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS). 3 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/AdultLearninginFocus.pdf NULL
146 State Capacity for Leadership: Ensuring Meaningful Higher Education Involvement in State Implementation of New Assessments Aligned with the Common Core State Standards Jones, Dennis P. - McGuinness, Jr., Aims C. 2011 FREE Download The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and assessments aligned to them represent asignificant milestone in public education reform in the U.S. Developed with consultation fromhigher education, the rigorous new standards and the assessments now being drafted by twoconsortia promise to help students reach higher levels of academic achievement and increase theirlikelihood of enrolling and succeeding in college.The mission of the consortia is to create assessments that reflect the CCSS and accuratelymeasure college readiness. This work could lead to significant improvements in the preparation ofmany students for postsecondary study and smooth their transition between high school andcollege. Higher education systems stand to benefit as well since better preparation should reducethe high proportion of students requiring developmental courses when they enroll, limit the costsassociated with those classes, and cut the average time to a credential. Achieving those results,however, will require the support of higher education not only throughout the development of theexams but also into their full implementation.As a first step toward encouraging higher education systems to endorse and base judgments aboutstudents' college readiness on the new assessments, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundationand Lumina Foundation requested the National Center for Higher Education ManagementSystems (NCHEMS) to identify the conditions that help build consensus between K-12 andpostsecondary systems at a state level. Prepared for The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and The Lumina Foundation. 2 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/NCHEMS-State_Capacity_For_Leadership-12042011-FINAL.pdf NULL
147 Performance Funding: From Idea to Action Jones, Dennis P. 2011 FREE Download Performance funding the linking of allocation of resources to accomplishment of certain desired outcomes is an idea that is once again finding favor with policymakers. It has intuitive appeal; what's not to like about paying for results? While it is a notion that makes common sense to most decisionmakers, it is an idea with a very checkered past it has been tried, found wanting, and with few exceptions abandoned. A review of past experiments suggests that it's not the idea that failed, but the design and implementation of the strategies that derived from the idea. This brief paper presents a set of first principles for putting in place an approach to performance funding that will help policymakers avoid many of the pitfalls that plagued prior efforts in this arena. The principles presented fall into two categories those dealing with design of the system, and a separate set dealing with implementation. Prepared for Complete College America (December 2011). 4 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/PerformanceFunding121411.pdf NULL
150 Increasing College Attainment in the United States: Variations in Returns to States and Their Residents Crellin, Matt - Kelly, Patrick J. - Prince, Heath 2012 FREE Download The popularity of the national goals for college completion established by the Obama administration and large philanthropic organizations such as Lumina and the Bill and Melinda Gates foundations has sparked a flurry of related activities across U.S. postsecondary education. With the help of these philanthropies, organizations such as Complete College America and the National Governors Association are working directly with policymakers and other higher education leaders in some states to set specific goals for the education levels of their working-aged populations. Other states are following suit without much direct outside intervention. The college-completion agenda is based on the premise that higher education produces both private and public financial benefits and thereby encourages economic prosperity. The National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS), in partnership with the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP), set out to investigate this founding premise by estimating the monetary returns the US as a whole and each of the 50 states would experience as a result of increasing the numbers of college graduates they produce. The results showed that increasing college attainment across the board generates greater benefits in some states than in others due to a combination of their economy and tax policies. Such findings add a new layer of complexity to the college completion agenda, both on the individual and state level.The general acceptance of the strong relationships between education, income, and public economic strength is at the core of all of college attainment goals at the national and state levels. 13 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/ChangeMagKellyCrellinPrince_July 2012.pdf NULL
152 The "Quality Agenda:" An Overview of Current Efforts to Examine Quality in Higher Education: A http://www.nchems.org/papers-publications/publications-search/publication-detail/?id=69 Ewell, Peter T. 2012 FREE Download The U.S. has established ambitious goals for raising postsecondary attainment levels among its citizens. More specifically these goals aim for sixty percent of young adults with a postsecondary credential within the next ten to fifteen years a goal which, if achieved, would restore the nation's place as the global leader in educational attainment levels. Deemed the Completion Agenda these goals, and associated policy initiatives to achieve them, are shared by the Obama administration, foundations like Lumina and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and a number of states. They are laudable and, with significant effort, achievable. But they are worrisome with respect to academic quality. If colleges and universities lower their academic standards, they stand a better chance of graduating the requisite numbers. And if this tempting route is taken, the Completion Agenda fails because substandard credentials not only shortchange students, but also render the nation and its workforce less competitive in the international marketplace. Paper prepared for the American Council on Education (ACE) 1 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/ACEOutcomesPaper_October2012.pdf NULL
153 Retention and Transfer in Colorado's Public Colleges and Universities Kelly, Patrick J. - Crellin, Matt 2012 FREE Download As higher education policymakers and stakeholders in Colorado begin to focus more on college completion (rather than just access) to better prepare the state's residents and workforce for an increasingly knowledge-based and globally-competitive economy, it is imperative to support the effort with sound data and information. In Colorado, and across the nation, two of the most critical milestones for college students in their pursuit of a college degree are returning for their second year of study, and transferring from a two- to four-year college for community college students who wish to earn bachelor's degrees. It is not unusual for first-to-second year retention and transfer to dominate much of the conversation about higher education policy. The purpose of this report is to provide a detailed analysis of retention and transfer for the Colorado public system of postsecondary education. 11 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/CONCHEMSRetentionandTransferinColoradoFinal_2012.pdf NULL
155 Outcomes-Based Funding: The Wave of Implementation Jones, Dennis P. 2013 FREE Download Two years ago Dennis Jones wrote a brief paper entitled Performance Funding: From Idea to Action. In that paper he proposed a set of design and implementation principles to guide states that were considering incorporating an outcomes-based component in their resource allocation model. When that paper was written only a handful of states, Tennessee and Indiana most notably, were using outcomes-based funding across the full spectrum of institutions. In several other states, the idea was either being applied in a single system or being actively discussed. In the intervening two years much has happened. For Complete College America 4 http://www.nchems.org/wp-content/uploads/Outcomes-BasedFundingPaper 091613.pdf NULL
157 How Liberal Arts and Sciences Majors Fare in Employment: A Report on Earnings and Long-Term Career Paths Humphreys, Debra - Kelly, Patrick J. 2014 20 For purchase via AACU. 13 http://secure.aacu.org/store/detail.aspx?id=LASCIEMPL NULL
158 Using Evidence of Student Learning to Improve Higher Education Kuh, George D. - Ikenberry, Stanley O. - Jankowski, Natasha A. - Cain, Timothy Reese - Ewell, Peter T. - Hutchings, Pat - Kinzie, Jillian 2015 40 American higher education needs a major reframing of student learning outcomes assessment.Dynamic changes are underway in American higher education. New providers, emerging technologies, cost concerns, student debt, and nagging doubts about quality all call out the need for institutions to show evidence of student learning. From scholars at the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA), Using Evidence of Student Learning to Improve Higher Education presents a reframed conception and approach to student learning outcomes assessment. The authors explain why it is counterproductive to view collecting and using evidence of student accomplishment as primarily a compliance activity. Today's circumstances demand a fresh and more strategic approach to the processes by which evidence about student learning is obtained and used to inform efforts to improve teaching, learning, and decision-making. Whether you're in the classroom, an administrative office, or on an assessment committee, data about what students know and are able to do are critical for guiding changes that are needed in institutional policies and practices to improve student learning and success.Available from Jossey-Bass. 2 http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118903390.html NULL
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